Mars Hill

by Andrea Elizabeth

I gave Mars Hill Audio a perusal today after trying to find the article on Thomas Kincaid that Owen referenced yesterday. While waiting for that back issue to arrive, as I continue to do, I listened to this free podcast teaser about several more of their articles. The common thread is the necessity of limits and the lack thereof leading to social disorder. Here’s the teaser’s teaser:

This issue of Audition features commentary by MARS HILL AUDIO host Ken Myers about recent on-line essays by political theorist Patrick Deneen. The four essays discussed were posted on Deneen’s blog, What I Saw in America, and they each offered perspective on our current economic crisis gleaned from classical political philosophy. The essays were titled: “Abstraction,” “Political Philosophy in the Details,” “Whack a Mole,” and “Democracy in America.” Also referenced in Myers’s comments is the 1976 book by sociologist Daniel Bell, The Cultural Contradictions of Capitalism. Patrick Deneen, associate professor of government at Georgetown University, was also a guest on Volume 91 of the MARS HILL AUDIO Journal; a portion of that interview may be heard here. In this interview, Deneen and Myers discuss the thought of Wendell Berry, whom Deneen describes as a “Kentucky Aristotelian.”

Ken Myers also comments on an article from the May 2008 issue of Harper’s by Wendell Berry. Berry’s article, “Faustian Economics: Hell Hath No Limits,” identifies the destructive (yet perennially attractive) Gnostic tendency to assume that limits are bad and always in need of breaking, a tendency implicated in many forms of cultural disorder.

Finally, Myers previews a new audiobook published by MARS HILL AUDIO, called The Passionate Intellect: Incarnational Humanism and the Future of University Education, by Norman Klassen and Jens Zimmermann.

I wish I didn’t have such a stack of neglected books to read, that last one looks and sounds really good. I hope the author with the Irish accent reads the audio version. As to Thomas Kincaid, hmmm.

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